Confidentiality

In certain cases Nightline will break confidentiality.

Terrorism

The Prevention of Terrorism Act 
1989 requires Nightline to report any relevant information to the police. If confidentiality is broken in this the caller will not be told we have done so as this could constitute assistance or joint liability for a crime.

Crime including fraud and money laundering

The Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, the Fraud Act 1997 and the Money Laundering Regulations 2003 all require Nightline to report any relevant information to the police. If confidentiality is broken in this situation the caller will not be told we have done so as this could constitute assistance or joint liability for a crime.

Court order

In other cases where a court order is issued Nightline would break confidentiality and pass on all relevant information to the police.

Information relating to children

If the call taker feels a child is being neglected or is in imminent danger, confidentiality will be broken and all relevant information reported to the police or Social Services. If confidentiality is broken in this situation the caller will not be told we have done so.

Danger to others

If the Nightliner taking the call feels that there are other people in imminent danger confidentiality will be broken and all relevant information reported to the police. If confidentiality is broken in this situation the caller will not be told we have done so.

Danger to Self, including suicide

If the person taking the call feels that the person may be a danger to themselves the person taking the call may ask the caller if they would like an emergency service to be called on their behalf. The emergency services will then be contacted.

If the caller does not want an emergency service to be contacted, Nightline will not contact them on their behalf.